U.S. Africa Institute is a 501(c) (3) innovative educational non-profit organization established to advance universal access to education across intersectional identities targeting historically disadvantaged students, including women and girls, students of disabilities, rural students, ethnic and minority students, and other marginalized groups of students.

US Africa Institute works with a historically marginalized and disadvantaged group of students in secondary and post-secondary education across intersectional identities, including disability status, sexual orientations, gender, refugee status, geographical locations, ethnic and tribal minorities, rural areas, and other vulnerable groups of students in Sub Saharan Africa countries to address educational inequities and disparities.

  

Vision Statement 

The vision of the US Africa Institute is to ensure educational equity across intersectional identities gender justice through Integrated Virtual Learning Support (IVLS), Culturally Competent Interventional Programs (CCIP), and Citizen and Education Diplomacy (CED).  

Mission Statement

The vision of the US Africa Institute is to address educational inequities and disparities targeting a historically marginalized and disadvantaged group of students in secondary and post-secondary education across intersectional identities, including disability status, sexual orientations, gender, refugee status, geographical locations, ethnic and tribal minorities, rural areas, and other vulnerable groups of students in Sub Saharan Africa countries. 

Educational inequity across intersectional identities, including gender, disability status, ethnicity, refugee status, geographical locations, socio-economic status, & other identities, resulting in high rates of exclusion, hinders them from accessing secondary & post-secondary education equitably. Today, more than 100 million women & girls, students with disabilities & other marginalized groups of students are out of secondary and post-secondary education in sub-Saharan Africa. 

The root causes of the problems are multifaceted; centuries of enslavement, colonialism, imperialism, and neocolonialism. Similarly, structural, geographical, political instability and conflict, poverty and economic challenges, cultural norms and practices, female genital mutilation, early or forced marriage, sexual violence have exacerbated and resulted in regional and domestic positions of inequity in the field of education in sub-Saharan Africa countries. There are also other related factors that exacerbate educational inequity such as lack of gender responsiveness among the teachers, ineffective teaching, lack of learning materials, female farming, poor learning environment, distance to schools, school-related gender-based violence, and impact of HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan African countries. 

Despite noble regional and global aspirations, inequality within and among regions and countries, only four out of every 100 children in Africa is expected to enter a graduate and postgraduate institution, compared to 36 out of 100 in Latin America and 14 out of 100 in South and West Asia.

Despite concerted national, regional, and global efforts, the gender gap and gender inequity, and access to education appear to have continued to remain the same due to factors related to political violence, the proliferation of conflicts, forced migration, pervasive poverty, persistent cultural attitudes, child prostitution, early pregnancies and long distances to schools. 

Now is the time to address educational inequity in sub-Saharan Africa as the situation gets worsened due to the global novel coronavirus. In sub-Saharan Africa countries, historically disadvantaged groups of students were at a distinct educational disadvantage. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated inequality that already exists in education in the region. Now is the time for bold ideas and commitments to ensure access to educational equity as a critical step in achieving the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals in building an Africa without foreign aid, and meet the continents labor force which is expected to surpass that of India and China by 2040. Similarly, the future success of the region and the continent in general lies to a large degree in its ability to hone the skills and talents of its ever-growing and education-demanding youth population by ensuring access to secondary and post-secondary education.